TECH SUPPORT DIALOGUE

ON DECEMBER 9TH, 2017 FROM NOON-2PM PST, SOIL GALLERY WILL HOST A LOW KEY CONVERSATION ABOUT HOW THE ARTS & TECH COMMUNITIES CAN BETTER SUPPORT ONE ANOTHER. FACILITATED BY CURATOR COLLEEN RJC BRATTON & MINH NGUYEN, THE CONVERSATION WILL FEATURE BRIEF ARTIST (Dori Scherer, Forrest Perrine, Luke Armitstead) & TECHIE TALKS (Mike pell of Microsoft & Gretchen Burger of Fearless 360). FOR THOSE NOT ABLE TO ATTEND, THE EVENT WILL BE LIVE BROADCASTED & RECORDED VIA SOIL'S INSTAGRAM. SNACKS & BEVERAGES PROVIDED. CLick Here to RSVP.

 

 online DIALOGUE

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thoughts from tech support artists:

katie holden:
"I hope for a more imaginative future. I can purchase a miniature 3D printed Eames chair, but how can I feel and inhabit the chair without ever touching it? The boundary between sensation and touch within technology and art is what I am most excited about. What objects, however rudimentary, can we create to facilitate and enhance an experience? I’m interested in how artists can accessorize and be in conversation with mass produced products."

Christian D Schmit:
"The title of my piece is the same as a song on Rush’s Signals album, released in 1982. In 1982 I was 10 years old. I played video games on my Commodore 64, Rush was my favorite band. I was a terrible student, more interested in doodling dragons all over my textbooks and staring out of windows. I played Dungeons and Dragons and watched movies with my misfit friends. Here are some movies that came out in 1982: Blade Runner, The Thing, E.T., Star Trek: The Wrath of Kahn, Poltergeist, Tron, Conan the Barbarian and The Dark Crystal. Was I a child in the greatest period in human history? Yes. Yes, I was.

We Used to Wait. This is another song title, this time by the Arcade Fire. I struggle with this longing for the old technology. Is it hopeless nostalgia, or was it a good thing that, after the disk was shoved in the drive, or the rewind button pressed on the cassette player, we used to wait? We had to earn the experience while the information loaded. And the information was never complete. There was no virtual and there was no reality. There was room to imagine and dream.

The titular Kid in the Rush song is a dreamer, and his computer is a conduit for his dreams. An analog signal is one that is written as it is recorded, as opposed to a digital signal that is encrypted. The Kid is discovering new emotions, and they are overwhelming; his emotions are pure, analog, as opposed to the Digital Man (also a Rush title) who is paranoid, twisted, conniving. The Kid plays his games, watches his movies, dreams his dreams. He writes his own stories. His heart is open. His technology doesn’t replace his imagination, it inspires his imagination. The Tech Supports his dreams."

Luke Armitstead:
"I guess I would like to say that I am quite excited about the tech boom.

When I was growing up in Seattle, I always wanted the city to be bigger and more exciting. All of this is happening now, and I am happy that people are moving here so fast. With all of this recent change with Amazon and other tech companies moving here, I have seen an overall spark in the other areas of the city. The Visual Arts are becoming more passionate, and the politics are coming closer to the surface.

We are definitely in growing pains. Seattle is a new city with new ideas. I am quite excited to see where Seattle will be when I am in my old age."

 

thoughts from the community